Free Shipping On Orders Over $150 *USA Only

Blog / wedding invites

Figuring Out Casual Wedding Invites

With wedding invites, couples often agonize over how they’ll say, “We’re getting married, want to come?” especially when the wedding is formal. But what if you’re hosting something a bit more casual? Are your invitation options at all expanded? Maybe even limited? If you’re hosting a backyard barbeque for fifty people, do you really need RSVP cards and inserts and that little piece of opaque tissue paper? Here are some ideas and a few bits of guidance…   For RSVPs:
Even if you’re trimming down your bulky invite envelope, a casual wedding invitation should probably include an RSVP card. While this is a personal choice (and the money you would save on both printing and postage is alluring), getting rid of RSVP cards in favor of email or website RSVPing is an invitation for late (or totally absent) RSVPs from your nearest and dearest. Guests are used to filling out the little card and sending it back for wedding invites. It is much too easy to forget if the little reminder isn’t calling out to them from their refrigerator every morning.
Just this once, deal with the price of postage and enjoy the rewards of NOT calling your relatives a week before the wedding to see if they’re planning on showing up. It’s worth the saved labor even with the extra printing fees. For wording:
The only info you MUST include on your invitation is where and when your guests should show up. Everything else (even the shape and dimensions of your invitation) are completely up to you. Well, full names are helpful too, even on save-the-dates. I’ve heard of families receiving super trimmed-down informal invites that featured only the first names of the happy couple – no date or return address. This is an especially helpful bit of info for your guests if you’re inviting family that hasn’t heard from (or of) you in a while. Even if you’re going informal, think of playing with the style instead of the number of words you’ve got on your inner envelope.   For inserts:
While we’re all familiar with the extra-thick wedding invitation envelope in our mailbox, not all weddings are held to this creamy, caligraphied standard. If you’re hosting a casual wedding, your invites should reflect the tone of your event. There’s no need to go overboard. Even with the invention and proliferation of wedding websites and other access points for guests, your invitation is their first guess at what to expect at your nuptials. The numerous inserts and inexplicable sheet of tissue paper is a bundle that is typically reserved for big fancy weddings. If it isn’t your style, skip it. Forget the separate reception card and hotel information and the inner envelopes - you can fit everything your guests need on one postcard if you need to. Save the postage (but send an RSVP)!
Read more

The Secret behind Inexpensive Wedding Invitations

The Evolution of Inexpensive Wedding Invitations

Inexpensive Wedding Invitations

It’s a complete myth that you can’t find quality elegant inexpensive wedding invitations for your upcoming nuptials that fit your style. With the evolution of print media and the prevalence of online resources at your 21st century disposal, even the thriftiest bride can find inexpensive wedding invitations that fit the theme and style of her day. With resources such as inexpensive wedding invitations kits and packages, anyone with access to a printer (either one at home or in a copy shop) can create one-of-a-kind high-quality inexpensive wedding invitations. Most inexpensive wedding invitations (specifically the ones in kits) also come with other bits of stationary for your wedding.   Many inexpensive wedding invitations sets feature more than one design, depending on the option you choose. Even if you don’t like the featured design on a set of inexpensive wedding invitations, always click on them to check for additional designs.   Sets of customizable and varied inexpensive wedding invitations often also feature stationary like programs, table numbers, save-the-dates, and menus. The more cohesive and custom your stationary, the more put-together your day looks as a whole. So stop thinking that inexpensive wedding invitations have to be custom-ordered from an overpriced graphic designer and start planning the design you want featured in your own inexpensive wedding invitations!
Read more

Getting the Wording Right: Formal Wedding Invites

More couples worry about the wording of their invitations than they do over any other detail of their wedding day. Wedding advice columns are always overflowing with lines like: “How should I word invitations if I’m hosting my own wedding?” or “How should I design my vow renewal invites?” Honestly, not much changes in each of these invitation scenarios if you’re sticking with a formal look. Guests expect formal invitations to look a certain way, and subtle changes in wording will keep the look and feel of traditional invites while changing erroneous information that guests aren’t even likely to notice. Take the following formal invite wording, which we’ve come to know and love:  

Mr. Joe Shmo and Mrs. Jen Shmo

Request the honor of your presence
at the ceremony uniting their daughter

 

Ms. Joanne Shmo

To

Mr. Jacob Boe

 

In the bonds of holy matrimony

 

On Sunday the Fifteenth of September
Two Thousand and Thirteen

At Four O’ Clock in the Afternoon

 

Reception to Follow     Think about revising that template if… Your ceremony is actually a Vow Renewal:
Vow renewals, like first weddings, happen when they do for a variety of reasons, most of which are completely valid. You have every right to a fun day of celebrating your unity with your family, but you have to keep in mind that a vow renewal isn’t a wedding. There are certain things you have to miss out on (bachelorette parties, bridal showers) and you should always be honest with your guests. If you signed the paperwork already, you’re married, and the invitation wording should reflect that. Think about changing:  

At the ceremony uniting

 

Ms. Joanne Shmo

To

Mr. Jacob Boe

 

In the bonds of holy matrimony   To  

At the vow renewal ceremony of

 

Mrs. Joanne Boe

And
Mr. Jacob Boe    

The hosting of your wedding isn’t clear, or you want to de-emphasize it:
Weddings used to be fully-funded by the parents of the bride, but that’s rare now. Couples are marrying later, family financial dynamics are shifting, and many couples want to make their own way in the world and are hosting the whole shebang themselves. If you still choose to word your invites so that the hosting situation for your wedding is clear, that’s completely fine. If not, think about changing:

Mr. Joe Shmo and Mrs. Jen Shmo

Request the honor of your Presence   To:  

Together with their families

 

Ms. Joanne Shmo

and

Mr. Jacob Boe

 

Request the honor of your presence…

Read more